Google My Business image with GMB logo and mapping

Image from Luce Media showing Google My Business logo

Why Google My Business, Google Maps, and Online Reviews are CRUCIAL to your business? Here’s What You Need To Know.

Image from Luce Media showing Google My Business logoGoogle My Business provides you with the ability to list your business location on Google Maps and local search results. You can display valuable and key information about your business, including the opening/closing times, contact phone number or a link to your website. You can display important information about your business, including the opening/closing times, contact phone number or a link to your website. More recently Google has also released a new feature allowing you to post a link to articles or up and coming events.

Setting up your Google My Business listing is one of the simplest and most effective ways of establishing your business to be found online. More and more search queries are becoming geographically specific, and Google’s algorithms have been developed to consider user intent. Why do this? Check how often your business shows up in local searches by clicking here. (Scroll down to FREE Online Visibility Check)

So, how important are Google Reviews for Local SEO in 2018? Several studies regarding Google reviews provide proof of the reasons that your business should be soliciting reviews.  These reasons include things like “most consumers read reviews before making a decision” and “people trust online reviews as much as personal reviews.”

These reasons are completely valid and will come into play creating larger conversion and clickthrough rates to your website when a potential customer has found you and is deciding between your business and a competitor. For these reasons Luce Media Video Talks About Google My Business and Google Reviews

When it comes to reviews – here is the bottom line. 

The quality and quantity of reviews on Google is one of the most important ranking factors for local SEO. And, when a person scans the search results for a local product or service in Google, the business listings that include customer reviews present greater credibility and, naturally, receive more clicks.

Watch as Mark Toney, CEO of Luce Media talks about the latest information for small to medium-sized businesses in completely filling out the information on Google My Business as well as the importance of soliciting Google Reviews for your business.

 

We can not stress the Importance of Google My Business, Google Maps and Good Reviews for Small to Medium Sized Businesses.

This is just one of many of the aspects we focus on for your business -and encourage YOU to look at all these variables.  Do you want to GROW your business? Do you want more online presence?

Luce Media works strategically helping all of our clients grow. Get started today with our FREE Social Media Analysis. We analyze your website, all current social platforms you are on plus tell you immediately what your Online Visibility looks like.  I guarantee you will learn key elements to grow your business.  And it is FREE.

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn to continue learning.

If your business needs help with social media marketing in McKinney, TX., please call us at (469) 907-1057.  Luce Media has deep expertise in Digital Marketing, B2B Marketing, Internet Marketing and is a well-established Digital Media Consultant in McKinney, TX.

Forms of Social Media Engagement

Social Media Metrics: The Most Important Analytics To Measure Engagement

Are you using the right social media metrics and analytics tools to monitor, assess and improve your social media performance?

What analytics are you measuring and what should you be measuring in your social media tracking?

Monitoring your social media analytics can make the difference between the success or failure of your social media presence.

Images of Likes, Tweets Share, etc.

Web and Internet concept with social media and social network signs and words on bouncing colorful spheres isolated on white background.

The world of social media has taken off so significantly in recent years that there are now all sorts of different metrics, analytics, and tools you can use to look at the performance of your social media content.

Engagement on social media and engagement with your brand are two separate things. While you think that people are engaging with your brand on social media, they’re still on someone else’s network, with the ability to be distracted by something else – a cat, maybe – at any time.

It’s not your time, it’s theirs.

However, when they move onto one of your properties – your website, principally, you can start to analyze what they’re really doing. And this is where social metrics gets really interesting.

Take, for instance, the difference between Twitter and Facebook visitors once they’ve landed on your site. I’ve frequently found huge differences in subsequent engagement, with many Twitter Graphic Showing: Best & Worst Times To Post to Facebook & Twittervisitors leaving after one or two pages at most, and Facebook visitors (on the desktop) staying for at least four pages. Think of how you use Facebook. During the evening hours, many users will scroll through their feeds until they see the last thing they remember on Facebook.

How likely is your audience to share your content? When your followers and fans feel motivated to spread your message, your engagement can increase exponentially.

You’ll find engagement levels through different metrics in your social media insights. Engagement can be in the form of retweets, forwards to a friend, comments, likes, shares, and inbound links.

The engagement rate for social media is typically defined as the total number of interactions with your content divided by the total number of impressions it receives. While this KPI (A Key Performance Indicator is a measurable value that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives) can help you determine at a high-level if people engage with your social content, it won’t tell you if they do so in ways that are meaningful and profitable for your business. What counts as a meaningful social interaction varies from industry to industry, and even from company to company.

If your social metrics include irrelevant actions, it will be difficult to tell if you’re making the impact you intend. Thus, it’s important to have a narrowly defined engagement rate that only includes interactions relevant to your brand goals.

To develop a custom engagement rate, the first step you need is to define the engagements that matter.

Facebook interactions and engagements take form in:

  • Likes
  • Comments
  • Shares
  • Video Views
  • Views of Facebook Live
  • Link Clicks

Instagram (although owned by Facebook) has its own form of engagement tools:

  • Hearts (double tapping)
  • Instagram stories
  • Commenting
  • Inbound messaging
  • Regramming

Some of Twitter’s default engagement rate includes all interactions:

  • Retweets
  • Replies
  • Follows
  • Likes (hearts)
  • Link clicks
  • Hashtag clicks
  • Profile photo clicks

A general guideline for determining a user’s level of effort is to consider how engaged or interested that user is at the moment they interact. A simple and easy formula is to assign a weight system based on the user’s level of effort. For instance, if a user were to give you a Like on Facebook, heart on Instagram or a Like on Twitter – you would assign a 1 to that action given it is the lowest threshold of engagement you can deliver on those three platforms.

On the other hand, if a user viewed your video or watched a Facebook Live session – you might assign a 3 to that action in that it required more engagement on their part.

Along those lines, if a user SHARED a Facebook post or Retweeted a tweet you might assign a 5 to that action.  The viral nature of that engagement will potentially yield you more followers or customers in the end.

In the end, we recommend you harden your social reporting. Make sure the information you are collecting and monitoring is relevant, make it real-world, and not stuck in the isolated environment of the social network itself. Then you’ll get the acknowledgment and the return on investment that you need.

Here at Lucé Media, our team works with small- to medium-sized businesses and individuals who want to benefit from innovative, exciting new approaches to digital engagement. If you need top-notch assistance with your social media branding efforts, contact Lucé Media today!

Bounce Rate and Landing Pages

Everything You Should Know About Bounce Rate

Bounce Rate is one of the most misunderstood metrics in web analytics.  Let’s demystify it for you.

A bounce is a single-page session on your website. OK, here is the very technical explanation: In web analytics, a bounce is calculated specifically as a session that triggers only a single request to the Analytics server, such as when a user opens a single page on your site and then exits without triggering any other requests to the Analytics server during that session.

You find your bounce rate using Google Analytics.

Bounce Rate is the percentage of all sessions on your site in which users viewed only a single page and triggered only a single request to the Analytics server.

Everything You Should Know About Bounce Rate

The Metrics of an Average Website

These single-page sessions have a session duration of 0 seconds since there are no subsequent hits after the first one.

High bounce rates typically indicate that the website isn’t doing a good job of attracting the continued interest of visitors.

Three Reasons a high Bounce Rate is a GOOD thing?

Is a high bounce rate always a bad thing? It depends.

For example, if the success of your site depends on users viewing more than one page, then, yes, a high bounce rate is bad. Consider this: If your home page is the gateway to the rest of your site (e.g., blog posts, eCommerce pages, your checkout process) and a high percentage of users are viewing only your home page, then you don’t want a high bounce rate.

  1. On the other hand, if you have a single-page site like a blog, or offer other types of content where single-page sessions are expected, then a high bounce rate is perfectly normal.  And don’t always view Bounce Rate as a bad thing.  What if your user came to your site to specifically find a phone number or address or other contact information? Sometimes the user found exactly what they wanted and left.
  2. If you have several “landing pages” where you have a web form to fill out you will end up with a high bounce rate. But that is not a bad thing.
  3. Let’s say you have an eCommerce site where you are selling products. You are likely to have a lot of links to affiliated products or services. In this case, you WANT a high bounce rate.

How to lower your bounce rate

If your overall bounce rate is high, then you can dig deeper to see whether it’s high on the home page only or on other pages as well.

Everything You Should Know About Bounce Rate

Lower Your Bounce Rate

For example, if just a few pages are the problem, examine whether the content correlates well with the marketing you use to drive users to those pages. Is your navigation from one page to another clear to your users on the next steps you want them to take.

If the problem is more widespread, have your web developer take a look at your tracking-code to be sure all the necessary pages are tagged and that they’re tagged correctly.

If you still have problems you may want to reevaluate overall design of your website.   Examine the language, graphics, color, calls to action, and visibility of important page elements.

8 Steps To Take to Lower Bounce Rates

  1. The single best way to lower your bounce rate is to amp up the engagement on the content you post.
  2. Make sure your site is optimized for use on mobile phones and pads. 80% of all Internet users are on mobile. Nearly 60% of all searches are done on mobile phones.
  3. Make sure you consistently use key words for your website. Have a content and keyword strategy
  4. Try to provide relevant content and showcase it. Also always be looking freshen up the content you are serving to visitors.
  5. Pay attention to how you create navigation. Make it clear and easy to understand.
  6. Make sure there is an easy to find search function on your home page or landing page.
  7. Get rid of pop-up ads.
  8. Make sure any external links are set to open in a new tab or window. Sharing external content is great, but do it in moderation.

Bounce Rate is a metric you can use to analyze your marketing efforts. You can use it to measure if you’re living up to your visitors’ expectations. And you can use the bounce rate to decide which pages need more attention. At Luce’ Media we can help you implement best practices to lower Bounce Rates and help you drive more users to your website.  Meeting your visitors’ expectations and making your pages more inviting for visitors all leads to creating an awesome website. And we all know that awesome websites rank better!

You might also be interested in improving the SEO for your website. Click here for more.